Blue Cheese

Blue Cheese Recipe

Blue cheese is the general name for cheese that has had the Penicillium cultures added to it. This produces flecks or veins of blue mold through the cheese. ‘Branded’ blue cheeses include Stilton, Gorgonzola and Roquefort.

  • 10 litres whole cows, goat or sheep milk
  • Tiny speck of Penicillium Roqueforti
  • 1/2 teaspoon Mesophilic starter i.e. Chr. Hansens R-704
  • Rennet diluted in 1/4 cup water (see manufacturers instructions for amounts)
  • 3 tablespoons of Cheese Salt
  1. Warm milk to 30c
  2. Add cultures, stir thoroughly
  3. Leave to ripen for 1 hour 30 minutes, keeping the temperature at 30c
  4. Add Rennet diluted in 10mls of boiled and cooled water
    Stir thoroughly
  5. Leave to set for 1 hour or use the Flocculation Method to achieve the optimum set
  6. Carefully cut the curd into a fine curd
    A whisk can be helpful for this but don’t cut the curds up too small with it, just to about the size of a small pea
    The smaller the curds, the firmer the cheese so the size can be altered to your desired moisture preference
  7. Stir curds every 5 minutes, over the next 60 minutes, to prevent them matting
    Maintain the temperature at 30 degrees Celsius
  8. Leave to rest for 5 minutes
  9. Drain the curds over a colander lined with cheese cloth as thoroughly as possible, while still keeping the curds warm
    The better the curds are drained, the more open the interior of the cheese
  10. Gently mix in 3 tablespoons of fine cheese salt
  11. Transfer the curds to open ended molds on draining mats and drain for 4 hours
    Turn every 15 minutes for the first hour
    Then turn every hour for the remaining 3 hours
  12. Turn again and leave for 8 hours, or overnight
    Cheese should be stored at 80% humidity at 20 degrees Celsius
  13. Turn again and leave for another 8 hours
    The same temperature and humidity as above should be provided
  14. Remove the cheese from the mold, sit on a draining mat to drain for another 8 hours
    The same temperature and humidity as above should be provided
  15. Sprinkle with salt, shaking off any excess
  16. Stack the cheeses on top of each other and ripen the cheeses at 95% humidity at 10 degrees Celsius
  17. Rotate and turn the stack each day for 7 days, rubbing each round with a small amount of salt each time
  18. Rotate and turn the stack for another 7 days, no further salt required
  19. Pierce the cheese with a fine needle at regular spacing approximately 2.5cms apart
  20. Ripen for another 90 days at the same humidity and temperature
    Turn the cheese every 3-4 days
    Mold should appear within the cheese with 1 month
    You will need to scrape any outer mold from the cheese during this period
  21. Wrap the cheese in foil or cheese paper and store at 8 degree until you are ready to eat

9 Comments

    • curdnerd

      25/04/2012 at 6:09 pm

      Hi Lindsey

      Thank you for spotting that! You are absolutely right.

      It should have read Mesophilic instead of Thermophilic. I had the right product code but typed in the wrong culture type. Ops!

      Sorry about that. I have fixed this up now : )

  1. Pingback: Age Does Matter - Aging Home Made Cheese | Curd-Nerd

  2. Grant

    16/06/2012 at 12:00 am

    I have found that ripping the young cheese apart allows for a more open texture and better mold distribution. Technique similar to milling is fine. We have tended to shred the curds after the first couple of turns, probably only a couple of hours after hooping. Another point. Stacking will close the cheese up there by inhibiting blue mild spread.

    I basically just tear the curds apart, don’t have to be the ‘walnut’ size talked about in milling a cheddar but just tear off chunks and rip it up and re hoop it. Stack post milling but experiment with your texture.

    • curdnerd

      31/08/2012 at 7:24 pm

      Hi Grant

      Thanks for your helpful advice! It makes sense that stacking would ‘close the cheese up’ and inhibit the blue mold.

      Pulling my cheese apart after hooping sounds scary but I’m keen to give it a try and see what it creates!

      Thanks again for such a useful comment : )

  3. newbienz

    07/02/2013 at 9:49 am

    Total newbie here … but it doesnt say to press this cheese ??? surely it needs to be pressed a little bit ?
    also ive read somewhere else they used a (sterilized )screwdriver to pierce the formed cheese with the penicillian Roquof. mould , they said that useing a needle didnt allow for enough oxygen to enable mould growth,
    i dont know either way … just wondering your opinion (and other readers ..?

    btw , thankyou for your wonderfull website , its been very helpfull. !!

    • curdnerd

      09/02/2013 at 2:52 pm

      Hi

      This cheese does not get pressed, similar to the Camembert and Brie makes.

      In terms of the piercing, you can use a larger item if desired, as long as it is sterile. I personally use a metal kebab skewer for mine, which allows a good mould growth.

      Thank you for your feedback about our site. So glad you are finding it helpful : )

  4. liz

    22/06/2013 at 10:04 pm

    after 60 days my blue cheese has no blue mold.? Please help

    • Curd-Nerd

      17/07/2013 at 3:50 pm

      Hi Liz

      We recently had another question about this. As I mentioned to this reader, you should definitely be seeing progress after 60 days so it sounds like your mold growth is being hampered by conditions of some sort. Are there other competing molds growing on the cheese? Are your humidity levels at the right point in your aging environment? And did the rest of the make go as expected? 10 degrees should be fine for aging, and you would need 95% humidity. Also, is there enough air flow to let the oxygen into the cavities, to encourage blue mold growth? These are a few things to consider, but let us know if we can help more.

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