Cheese Salt – What Kind Of Salt Is That?

By on 01/05/2011

Cheese Salt

On reading recipes for cheese making, you have probably noticed that salt is used quite a bit, both during the make and in the aging process.

You might also have noticed that it is referred to as cheese salt, canning salt or kosher salt.

But just what kind of salt is that? You might be familiar with the last two mentioned. But cheese salt?

Basically cheese salt is normally a flakey non-iodized salt. And the non-iodized part is the critical factor when it comes to cheese making.

Salt in cheese not only helps to improve the flavour, but it also helps to preserve it. Iodized salt though won’t help at all as the iodine in the salt inhibits the cultures and bacterias you WANT in your cheese.

Rocks vs flakes vs grains, when it comes to cheese salt, is all about how quickly (or slowly) the salt is taken in and helps with the process of extracting whey, forming a rind and inhibiting the bad bacteria. Ideally if you can get flakes that is the preference but otherwise get the grains. I would advise against buying rocks unless you are going to take them home and bash them up (for the cheese of course, not your stress relief ) so they are more easily assimilated.

So, that’s all there really is to cheese salt. It’s just flakey non-iodized salt. Easy!

11 Comments

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  4. kevin lusha

    17/03/2012 at 9:32 pm

    On failure of the trial and error process of buying the right salt can you point me in the right direction with a brand name perhaps, as I have spent much time perusing the salt collection in Tesco and still not found any that stipulate non-iodized and as much as I enjoy looking like I have a fetish for salt I can think of a better way to spend my afternoon, so any pointers would be greatly appreciated.

    • curdnerd

      19/03/2012 at 10:41 pm

      Hi Kevin

      I use a Himalayan pink salt here in New Zealand. I believe non iodized salt is sometimes also labeled as ‘plain salt’. Sorry, I am not aware of the brands available in the UK. I wasn’t making cheese during my time there so had no cause to go looking for it.

      One source I did find is http://www.naturalsaltseller.co.uk. They have non-iodised salt and may be worth a call.

      Good luck and thanks for your question : )

  5. Schuyler Campbell, Esq.

    26/04/2012 at 9:35 pm

    Any salt labeled “kosher” or “sea salt” is non-iodized

  6. DEBORA

    25/07/2012 at 4:22 am

    HELLO, CAN YOU TELL ME IF CITRUS ACID THAT YOU USE FOR MAKING CHEESE IS THE SAME CITRUS ACID THAT YOU USE IN CANNING FRUITS & VEGGIES? I HAVE CITRUS ACID FOR CANNING AND WAS JUST WONDERING IF I COULD USE IT FOR MAKING CHEESE . THANK YOU

    • curdnerd

      09/02/2013 at 4:32 pm

      Hi Debora

      It is one and the same.

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  8. Grace

    03/11/2012 at 12:26 pm

    Hi I am from NZ and I want to try making my own mozzarella. My family normally uses Himalayan pink salt, would that be good to use? It is non iodized, also we have sea salt flakes which are also non-iodized. Would that work or should I buy specific cheese salt?

    • curdnerd

      17/11/2012 at 1:46 pm

      Hi Grace

      Thanks for your question. The pink Himalayan salt is exactly what I use so yes, it’s fine to use.

      Cheese salt is non-iodized salt so you have the perfect ingredient : )

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