QA6 – Why Didn’t My Curd Knit Together?

QA6 – Why Didn’t My Curd Knit Together?

Why Didn't My Curd Knit Together?

If you’ve ever pressed a cheese and ended up with curd that has failed to knit together, you’ll know how disappointing this dilemma is. I certainly do!

The point of pressing your cheese is to not only expel the whey but it is also how the small curds are knitted together to form the smooth shape, texture and density of the cheese.

When the curds don’t knit properly you will get a range of results from creases, cracks and crevices throughout the cheese, or a complete catastrophe of curd that doesn’t form any kind of shape or mass and just falls apart.

So what causes a lack of knit with cheese curds? Read more

Cheese Making Press – How To Press Cheese

Cheese Making Press – How To Press Cheese

This post is Part 6 of the continued basic home cheese making instructions. See the Curd Nerd Beginner Page or the Basic Instructions category for previous parts.

Pressing your cheese is not only an important part of shaping the cheese but is also important in creating the texture and as part of the aging process.

 

What Cheese Needs Pressing

Soft cheeses need either no pressing, are pressed under their own weight or have minimal light weight applied to form the cheese.

Hard cheese on the other hand must be pressed and after your cheese has been through each of the steps to get to the point of having curds ready to turn into cheese, you need to apply enough weight in a way that will knit the curds, expel any extra whey and create the shape of your final product.

Read more

The Pressing Issue About Cheese

The Pressing Issue About Cheese

When I first started making hard cheeses I fashioned a cheese press out of all sorts of items. Filled stock pots of water, cans of food, rocks, anything that would give me enough weight to press the curds in the mold.

Eventually I got frustrated with the balancing acts (and the anxiety caused everytime said balancing acts didn’t work) and went looking for a proper press to upgrade my cheese making process.

I bought a press made by a local engineering student whose father is a cheesemaker.

The press works well but I found the mold that comes built into it is too wide in diameter, resulting in a larger flat cheese rather than a short stout one. The problem with larger flat cheeses is you end up with a lot more rind than paste as the drying area is bigger. Read more