QA9 – Can You Use Existing Cheese As Cultures For New Cheese?

QA9 – Can You Use Existing Cheese As Cultures For New Cheese?

propagating cheese culturesIn the past we’ve talked a little bit about various ways to reduce the cost of your home cheese making adventures.

It seems costs savings are still on the minds of some home cheese makers since we’ve been asked a few times now if existing cheeses can be used as cultures for making new cheese, as a means towards saving money. Read more

How To Make Blue Cheese Cultures (Penicillium Roqueforti)

How To Make Blue Cheese Cultures (Penicillium Roqueforti)

How To Make Blue Cheese Cultures (Penicillium Roqueforti)Are you a blue cheese fan? Do you love yourself some funky blue mold?

I have to say that blues aren’t my favourite cheese, but I can certainly enjoy the right one when I’m in the mood. I’ve had a couple of blues that were absolutely delicious, and there are certain times when I crave that extra something in my cheese.

If you’re a blue cheese fan and a home cheese maker, I’m guessing you’re either already trying your hand at making your own blues? Or at least it’s in your future plans.

A lot of Curd-Nerd’s are absolutely passionate about their blues, and are busy perfecting their own version. Some have great success, others are finding it a bit more challenging. Getting that blue mold to grow as it should is usually the biggest test. Read more

Do You Keep Making Dry, Crumbly Cheese?

Do You Keep Making Dry, Crumbly Cheese?

Do You Keep Making Dry, Crumbly Cheese?

Dry, crumbly, pasty cheese.

It’s the curse of any cheese that you hoped would turn out smooth and soft.

There are cheeses that we expect to have a slightly drier or crumblier texture, but when it isn’t planned, it’s a real disappointment, and the worst part is that you usually don’t know your cheese has gone that way until after you’ve waited weeks, or months, and then cut it open to find less than desirable results. Read more

QA8 – How Long Do I Have To Age My Raw Milk Cheeses Before I Can Sell Them?

QA8 – How Long Do I Have To Age My Raw Milk Cheeses Before I Can Sell Them?

Have you thought about selling your cheeses? Is it time to test your delicious creations out in the commercial market?

How Long Do You Need To Age Raw Milk Cheeses?

While most home cheese makers find making cheese for their family and friends enough of a thrill, some cheese making hobbyists decide to take things to the next level, and start thinking about selling their cheeses at markets or, if possible, in local stores. Read more

Why Your Camembert Isn’t Growing White Mold

Why Your Camembert Isn’t Growing White Mold

camembert mold, camembert cheese mold, camembert mould

 

With cheese making, there are a couple of real ‘buzz moments’ for me.

The first is when I get a really good, firm curd and get a strange satisfaction from cutting it in clean, neat lines. The other is when I make Camembert and see that gorgeous fluffy white mold growing over the cheese. That beautiful Camembert cheese mold, there’s nothing better than watching that white blanket start to cover over each round, signally the beginnings of another successful Camembert batch. Read more

4 New Recipes To Celebrate!

4 New Recipes To Celebrate!

cheese making

Wow! Curd-Nerd has just recently reached 400 (plus) subscribers!

I’m super excited that we have so many keen home cheese makers out there. And I’m so appreciative that so many of you have chosen to sign up to Curd-Nerd, and allow me to wander into your inbox every month (or so).

When I started this website approximately 18 months ago, I really didn’t know if anyone would ever read it, or find it useful. All I knew was that I wanted to share information on home cheese making and spread the word on how easy and enjoyable this hobby can be. Read more

Cheese Cultures Make Your Own And Save Money

Cheese Cultures Make Your Own And Save Money

Cheese Cultures Make Your Own Mesophilic Cultures

Back in the day, an important part of getting a good, tasty cheese meant having the right ingredients and conditions to nurture your own cultures, or to have had an established one shared with you to use.

These were, and still are, known as mother cultures. But what is cheese culture? Cheese culture is a lactic bacteria. This lactic bacteria when added to milk digests lactose to produce lactic acid and this is what causes curds to form. Read more

How To Add Cheese Starter Cultures

How To Add Cheese Starter Cultures

Cheese starter cultures

Cheese starter cultures are a form of bacteria used in the production of cheese. They are added to the milk at the start of the cheese making process (not for all cheeses though, there are exceptions such as Haloumi) in order to determine taste, smell, texture and mouth feel.

The main cheese starter cultures are Thermophilic and Mesophilic. Thermophilic cultures can handle being heated to higher temperatures, Mesophilic cultures  suffers at higher temperatures. There are also specific culture strains made by commercial manufacturers which fall into each of these types (Therm and Meso) and each subtly changes the results you will get with your cheese. Your recipe should tell you which culture type you need.

Read more