QA9 – Can You Use Existing Cheese As Cultures For New Cheese?

QA9 – Can You Use Existing Cheese As Cultures For New Cheese?

propagating cheese culturesIn the past we’ve talked a little bit about various ways to reduce the cost of your home cheese making adventures.

It seems costs savings are still on the minds of some home cheese makers since we’ve been asked a few times now if existing cheeses can be used as cultures for making new cheese, as a means towards saving money. Read more

Cheese Cultures Make Your Own And Save Money

Cheese Cultures Make Your Own And Save Money

Cheese Cultures Make Your Own Mesophilic Cultures

Back in the day, an important part of getting a good, tasty cheese meant having the right ingredients and conditions to nurture your own cultures, or to have had an established one shared with you to use.

These were, and still are, known as mother cultures. But what is cheese culture? Cheese culture is a lactic bacteria. This lactic bacteria when added to milk digests lactose to produce lactic acid and this is what causes curds to form. Read more

Cheese pH Meter – Do You Need One For Cheese Making?

Cheese pH Meter – Do You Need One For Cheese Making?

Cheese pH Meter – Do You Need One For Cheese Making?Many new home cheese makers are surprised to discover that you don’t need a whole lot of fancy, technical equipment to make cheese.

Sure, you can go all out and buy the best of the best and get everything you could possibly want and need to make cheese, but you can also start making cheese with just a few basic tools and the right ingredients, and without spending a whole lot of money. Read more

Flocculation Method – For A Better Curd Set

Flocculation Method – For A Better Curd Set

Flocculation Method And What Is Flocculation?

As we all know, one of the most important steps in cheese making is getting a good curd set up.

Without a good set up, most cheeses won’t ever become what they should be, and some won’t become anything much at all. Apart from pig or chook feed, or compost waste that is.

Using the suggested coagulation times in a cheese recipe is reasonably reliable for getting a set, but not overly precise in terms of getting the best set to achieve the ideal cheese profile.

Sure, you might end up with a Gouda after all your hard work, but does it have the texture and moisture that you know it should have? Do you have a cheese that could give the all those store bought wedges a run for their money.

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